Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving by George Greenwood

Cover of: Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving | George Greenwood

Published by Kessinger Publishing .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Shakespeare studies & criticism,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Shakespeare

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages76
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8058668M
ISBN 100766142590
ISBN 109780766142596

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Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving [George Greenwood] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks.

Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving [Greenwood, George] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving. Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare.

The Chandos portrait Duncan-Jones thinks is genuine too, painted Cited by: 2. Genre/Form: Portraits: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Greenwood, G.G.

(Granville George), Sir, Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving. By flipping through a single book that I happened to have on hand, S. Schoenbaum's Shakespeare: The Globe and the World (Folger Shakespeare Library, ), I have found a number of contemporary depictions of Queen Elizabeth that show a person with a sharper chin than appears in either the Stratford bust or the Droeshout print (Schoenbaum pp.

Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare.

The Chandos portrait Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving book thinks is genuine too, painted Reviews: 4. Returning to the issue in with The Stratford Bust and The Droeshout Engraving, Greenwood noted the “vast amount of discussion and disputation” about the bust.

He argued again that the Dugdale drawing, which he had seen by then, “is absolutely unlike the effigy as it exists today” (10). The Droeshout engraving and Lewes Lewkenor. 26 Thursday Nov Posted by masteroftheceremonies in William Shakespeare The balding pate and rounded bush of hair above the ears bares some resemblance to the bust of the Stratford monument, so we may be sure we are looking at the same man, William Shakespeare, the actor.

But the face in the. explain the discrepancy, but concluded: “It seems absolutely certain that this Stratford bust is in reality not the original bust at all,” adding that “the whole thing is changed” (Problem ). Returning to the issue in with The Stratford Bust and The Droeshout Engraving, Green.

The Droeshout portrait or Droeshout engraving is a portrait of William Shakespeare engraved by Martin Droeshout as the frontispiece for the title page of the First Folio collection of Shakespeare's plays, published in It is one of only two works of art definitively identifiable as a depiction of the poet; the other is the statue erected as his funeral monument in Shakespeare's home town.

Duncan-Jones provides a detailed critique of three of the most widely accepted portraits: the engraving facing the First Folio’s title page; the sculptured stone bust that adorns Shakespeare’s funerary monument at Holy Trinity Church, Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving book and the “Chandos portrait,” an early seventeenth-century painting on canvas which.

Apart from the Droeshout woodcut and the Stratford bust, there are no portraits which can be definitively identified as representing William Shakespeare.

Even the Chandos painting, the very first picture acquired by the National Portrait Gallery, is only assumed to be of him because it represents a man who looks very much like our much-loved. Duncan-Jones believes that the Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, however deficient in artistry, were based on sketches, drawings, and/or memories of people who knew Shakespeare.

The Chandos portrait Duncan-Jones thinks is genuine too, painted. New events keep unfolding in this Big Year for Edward de Vere. Here's the new bronze bust to replace the traditional image, you know, the Engraving in the First Folio and/or the Bust in the Stratford church.

It was commissioned by a fellow named Ben August of Houston, a Shakespeare-lover who learned about. The Shakespeare funerary monument is a memorial to William Shakespeare located inside Holy Trinity Church at Stratford-upon-Avon, the church in which Shakespeare was baptised and where he was buried in the chancel two days after his death.

The monument, carved in pale blue limestone by Gerard Johnson, is mounted on the north wall of the features a demi-figure of the poet holding a. Martin Droeshout’s engraving of Shakespeare, printed in the first collected edition of his plays, is clumsily executed.

Gheerart Janssen’s funeral bust in Stratford parish church was. Why was it placed on the book’s title page, rather than facing it, as was customary for author portraits. Was it deliberately made strange. Explore this and other Mysteries of the First Folio with Katherine Chiljan, author of Shakespeare Suppressed.

*The other almost-contemporary portrait of Shakespeare is this bust in the Stratford Church. An engraving by Martin Droeshout as title-page to the collected works of Shakespeare (the First Folio), printed in and published in An introductory poem in the First Folio, by Ben Jonson, implies that it is a very good likeness.

The bust in Shakespeare's funerary monument, in the choir of Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-on-Avon. This. Prologue One: Shakespeare and the 'author portrait' Two: The Stratford bust Three: The Droeshout engraving Four: The Chandos portrait Five: Commemorative, disputed, and other portraits Note Bibliography Image Sources Acknowledgements Index.

The basis for comparison consisted of the Droeshout engraving of Shakespeare in the First Folio Edition of his Plays (), confirmed by dramatist Ben Jonson, and the funerary bust of Shakespeare in the Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon (/).

THE DROESHOUT PORTRAIT William Shakespeare The only portrait of the poet whom we know as William Shakespeare which can be unreservedly accepted as an attempt to offer a likeness, truthful or not, is the engraving bearing the name of Martin Droeshout, and prefixed as a frontispiece to the first, collected edition of Shakespeare's plays in The similarity between the Flower portrait and the Droeshout engraving con-stitutes the strongest single claim of the painting to be that missing source.

The other familiar portrait is the painted limestone bust in the Stratford fu-neral monument, attributed to Gerard Johnson, showing an older and puffier-faced man than in the Droeshout picture. The same ugly engraving reappeared in all the later editions up tu The bust on the monument at Stratford was first noticed in It was not taken from life, and is unlike any picture of Shakspere.

and not much like the Droeshout engraving in the Shakspere Folio. Shakspere probably never had a portrait taken. GENRE. History. The first proof is conclusive evidence against the contention that the “Flower Portrait” at the Shakespeare Memorial Museum, Stratford-on-Avon — the gift of Mrs Charles Flower () and boldly entitled the “Droeshout original” — is the original painting from which the engraving was made, and is therefore the actual life-portrait.

found: The Stratford bust and the Droeshout engraving, title page (by Sir George Greenwood) found: LC in RLIN, (hdg.: Greenwood, Granville George. Ian Donaldson is Honorary Professorial Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.

He has written many books on Jonson and is a General Editor, with David Bevington and Martin Butler, of the forthcoming seven-volume Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben eminent scholar, Donaldson is a Fellow of the British Academy and past president of the Reviews: Almost no one is pleased by Martin Droeshout’s engraving of our beloved “Star of Poets”.

Here’s the anonymous opinion of a writer for The Sun, reviewing Basil Brown’s Supposed Caricature of the Droeshout: “The abominable eidolon which appears in the First Folio, opposite BEN JONSON’S sly advice to the Reader to look rather upon the Booke than upon the picture, has been for nearly.

Select either image to see it larger. By the nature of her work, of course, Currie’s painting lent color and warmth to all of the images. For example, the book’s black and white engraving of Shakespeare by Marshall from the Poems, which scholars believe is loosely based on the Droeshout engraving, changed in the same way in her miniature for the binding.

Greenwood is the author of twelve books and numerous articles on the authorship question, all published – A prolific and entertaining writer, he engaged in a series of well-known public debates, carried on in books and in public forums of exchange such as newspapers and literary journals, with Sir Sidney Lee, the leading.

He is a competent, if undistinguished, craftsman working within a Flemish engraving tradition, derived from such engravers as Cornelis Cort ().The sculpted portrait bust over Shakespeare's tomb in the church of the Holy Trinity, Stratford fails to capture more than a general likeness but serves as a comparison to this engraving.

Today we’re going to run down the Stratford Monument, the Cobbe Portrait, the Chandos Portrait, and the Droeshout Engraving in our quest to see if. All that we have for sure, with the exception of a sadly porcine and generic painted bust in a church in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Beyond Droeshout, there. The Droeshout engraving. The best-known image of William Shakespeare is the iconic Droeshout engraving on the title page of the First Folio collection of his plays, published in The First Folio was an expensive production and an unprecedented tribute, so it has always seemed odd that its publishers included such a strange engraving.

Greenwood, The Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving (London, ), Green- wood was contradicting himself.

He himself had questioned the integrity of the bust and the monument architecture in The Shakespeare Problem Restated (London, ), one engraving. In the four and a half centuries since Shakespeare's death, over two hundred fifty "authentic" portraits of Shakespeare have turned up in attics, pubs, and warehouses, but unfortunately, only the Droeshout Engraving and the Janssen Bust over the Stratford monu- ment have a strong claim to being authentic likenesses.

This was reflected both in the literature of the time (Bottom, Falstaff, Caliban), and in many of the paintings and portraits, nowhere more so than in the curious engraving by Martin Droeshout that appeared as the frontispiece to the First Folio of and has since become the iconic representation of the Bard, appearing on anything from bank.

4 G. Greenwood, The Stratford Bust and the Droeshout Engraving (London, ), Greenwood was contradicting himself. He himself had questioned the integrity of the bust and the monument architecture in The Shakespeare Problem Restated (London, ), 5 Stopes, Environment, 6 Lewis, Documents, ii.

Well, OK, we kind of know. There is one (one!) picture that scholars agree portrays Shakespeare, a black-and-white engraving by a man named Martin Droeshout – please get in touch if you know how on earth to pronounce that name – which shows Shakespeare in a big fancy white collar.

The Shakespeare game, or, The mystery of the great phoenix User Review - Not Available - Book Verdict. A commercial success in Russia upon its publication inthis dense tome is the latest anti-Stratfordian effort claiming to solve the mystery of who really wrote the works attributed to William.

"The only two images with any strong claims of authenticity are the Droeshout and the bust in the church in Stratford. "Droeshout's has become iconic because it was approved by Ben Jonson. There are lines [by Jonson] praising the engraving for capturing the likeness, and we have no evidence that his friends and family disapproved of it.".

Only two likenesses, both posthumous, are widely accepted as authentic: a bust on his tomb in Stratford's Holy Trinity Church (right), restored and repainted several times, and the Droeshout.The Droeshout engraving is immediately followed in the First Folio by Ben Jonson's tribute to his dead colleague and friend and, as if in acknowledgement of its limitations, the reader is urged by him to 'look/Not on his picture, but his book'.

The memorial bust of Shakespeare in Stratford church (of uncertain date but installed by at the. However, in his full Country Life article, Griffiths claims that there are only two other authentic likenesses of Shakespeare: the Janssen bust in Stratford Church and the Droeshout engraving .

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